Monthly Archives: August 2017

September Preview

September. Month 9. Last month in Q3. WHAT?!

Back on January 31, I attended an admissions interview at the Institute of Holistic Nutrition for their part-time evening program starting in September 2017.

Well, I was accepted and that program starts NEXT WEEK!

That means my ‘normal’ schedule of coming home, being a couch-potato, and being in bed by 9:30 pm is LONG GONE! I’ll be in class Monday and Thursday from 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm for the next 2 years! Factor in travel time back home, I estimate getting home around 10:00 pm or so. Then factor in winding-down, feeding the cats, and showering … I think bed might be around 11:00 pm or so!

And you might be thinking “but Shannon, that’s only 2 nights a week – you GOT this!” and I believe you!! But what about the rest?

  • Day job … M-F, 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
  • Home-based business … varies
  • In-class … M & T, 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm
  • Homework & assignments … likely 6 – 7 hours per week
  • Travel … 30 min to/from work; 30-45 min to/from school
  • Weekly call with Mom
  • Housework

Plus I NEED to fit in TV time – not negotiable!

On top of all of this, I started using an amazing nutrition system on June 1, 2017 and have had AMAZING results in just 3 months (stay tuned for a complete 3-month update in early September … here is my direct site – if you have any questions, I would LOVE to connect)! While I have been using the system, I haven’t increased or changed my exercise amount … which is relatively low to none!

So now after 3 months, I want to incorporate actual exercise! Strength. Cardio. Abs.

  • Gym … 4 times per week, 1 hour minimum
  • Back-to-back cleanse days … once a week (2 days, obvi), on non-gym days

I decided to utilize my GonaGetHealthy account and Google calendar to literally block off time for everything that I’ll NEED to fit in! I still have a bunch of tweeking to do, but here’s what an average week in September will look like …

GGH Google Calendar

As you can see, I have a TON of time on Saturday (LOL) and possibly a few ‘spare’ hours on Sunday!

What have I gotten myself into!?

I am so ready for this! “Idle hands are the devils play things”, no?

So how about the last week of August? I am on vacation for 10 days … rather, staycation!

I started today off with a quick trip to Walmart in North Vancouver to pick up some essentials and some necessities! I grabbed deodorant, cat litter, toothpaste, and most exciting for the workout aspect, I bought 10-pound dumbbells! I currently have 2 lb balls, and 5- and 8-lb dumbbells, but know I needed 10-lb for my arm workouts. I also wanted a 12-lb dumbbell, but they didn’t have any and I’m not mentally ready for a 15-lb dumbbell!

Next up was my regular 3-week appointment with Quanh at Sophie Nails for my shellac manicure. She does such an awesome job – I just adore her! I opted for a nice white polish with a subtle gold shimmer on each ring finger.

What was next …

Oh yeah! Hop on the bus, and then another bus and hit up Indigo Chapters for a quick return. Then walk a couple of blocks to the skytrain for a 40-minute ride out to Surrey. Why? Well because I bought a wicked cute ironic-saying tank from Warehouse One but some of the silk screen letters were stuck together and it was wrecked …

So pop out there, return the tank (which I’ve already ordered a replacement online!), then hop back on the skytrain for another 40-minute ride back to Vancouver.

I got off the skytrain at the Stadium-Chinatown station because it’s right at the downtown Costco location! I needed to pick up a 5-pack of rollers … you know, the kind you use to get pet hair off your black clothes? Well I use a SHIT TON (technical term) of the roller sheets to de-hair my duvet cover after I wash it.

I also picked up some Boomchickapop popcorn, as one does at Costco, and some wicked awesome new frying pans by Heritage, called The Rock Plus! I got a 9 1/2″ pan and an 11″ pan for $44.99, plus tax. These pans are good for all cook-tops as well as they can go in the oven! Plus … the thickness of the pan, makes me think warping is a thing of the past!

That’s about all that I did today! Tomorrow isn’t too exciting … I have a bit of bookkeeping to take care of so that it’s off my list.

But Monday is exciting! I have a 1-hour massage at 9:00 am, then I see my wicked awesome Chiro, Tyler Hunsberger, at 10:15 am! OMG I can’t wait! I had such bad lower back pain back in January and Ty was able to work it out! I currently go see him once a month, but I might kick it up to every 2 weeks just for a bit of a boost.

On Tuesday, my folks are coming down for a few days … they are going to see Tom Cochrane and Redrider at the PNE on Tuesday, the three of us are going to bike the seawall on Wednesday, and then on Thursday, we’ll all go to the PNE and check out the exhibits … as well, we’re going to The Doobie Brothers!!!

After the parental units leave on Friday, I will still have 4 days with nothing planned! Not sure what I’ll end up doing … hopeful for beautiful weather for some seawall walks and natural Vitamin D.

Ok there you have it – a quick and dirty catch-up and preview post! Be sure to stay tuned for my 3-month results … and perhaps I’ll post my next 3-month goals!

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Weight-Loss Plateaus

Few aspects of weight loss are as frustrating as when the changes you’ve seen on the scale begin to slow down, and then seemingly stop altogether. If this sounds familiar, you may be experiencing a weight loss plateau.

Some reasons for slowed weight loss are obvious, such as when healthier diet and exercise choices begin to give way to old, less healthful habits. But it can be hard to identify the reasons for a weight loss plateau when you stick to the healthy lifestyle changes that have already helped you lose weight.

Here are three reasons for running into an unexpected weight loss plateau, along with simple strategies to help get the scale moving again.

1. You’re over your target for calories.

It’s clear that excess calories can slow your weight loss progress. However, it can be difficult to estimate how many calories you consume and expend in a day. Research suggests that most people, including trained healthcare professionals, tend to overestimate calories burned through exercise and underestimate calories consumed in food (1, 2). Even if you carefully keep track with a food journal or phone app, or wear an activity tracker, these methods can only provide a general estimate and are often much less accurate than you might expect (3).

A more practical approach is to look closely at your everyday habits and consider what potential impact they might have on your goals. For example, little “extras” such as sugar and cream in your morning coffee, or absent-minded snacking while you’re cooking a meal can really add up over the course of a day. A closer look at these habits might be what you need to get the scale moving again.

2. You’ve become too fit for your workout.

If your weight loss progress has stalled despite your consistent effort at the gym, it might be time to look at your exercise routine. As you become increasingly fit from the hard work you’re putting in, it’s essential that you adjust your workout routine so that it continues to challenge you.

This idea is captured by what fitness experts call the “overload principle” of training. Essentially, the principle is that when an exercise is below a minimum level of intensity, it doesn’t challenge the body enough to result in any change (4). The level of intensity you need to get results from your workout depends on your current level of fitness. As your level of fitness improves, you need to change your workout in order to keep seeing results. It can be as simple as continuing to increase the amount of weight you lift, or trying a new type of workout.

3. You’ve been skimping on sleep.

Many of us fail to get the recommended seven to eight hours of sleep each night. Unfortunately, research suggests that inadequate sleep could be interfering with weight loss success. Large, population-based studies consistently find a link between poor sleep quality and higher body weights (5). Some of the effects of poor sleep, such as changes in hormone balance, appetite regulation, and metabolism may explain the relationship between too little sleep and weight gain (6-8).

If your goal is weight loss, make sleep a priority. Start with simple changes in your routine such as avoiding caffeine late in the day, sticking to a consistent schedule, and limiting late-night screen time to help your body wind down at the end of the day. Adding a quality melatonin supplement to your evening routine is another step that can help prime your body for a restful, complete night’s sleep.

Making a few small changes might be all you need to get past a plateau. Identifying the cause of a weight loss plateau is key. While weight loss plateaus can be a frustrating part of the weight loss journey, they shouldn’t discourage you from reaching your goals.

References
  1. Brown RE, Canning KL, Fung M, Jiandani D, Riddell MC, Macpherson AK, Kuk JL. Calorie Estimation in Adults Differing in Body Weight Class and Weight Loss Status. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2016 Mar; 48(3):521-6. doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000796.
  2. Cottrell E, Chambers R. Healthcare professionals’ knowledge of calories. Nurs Stand. 2013 Jan 23-29;27(21):35-41.
  3. Chen J, Cade JE, Allman-Farinelli M. The Most Popular Smartphone Apps for Weight Loss: A Quality Assessment. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth. 2015 Dec 16;3(4):e104. doi: 10.2196/mhealth.4334.
  4. Garber CE, Blissmer B, Deschenes MR, Franklin BA, Lamonte MJ, Lee IM, Nieman DC, Swain DP; American College of Sports Medicine. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and neuromotor fitness in apparently healthy adults: guidance for prescribing exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Jul;43(7):1334-59. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e318213fefb.
  5. Jean-Louis G, Williams NJ, Sarpong D, Pandey A, Youngstedt S, Zizi F, Ogedegbe G. Associations between inadequate sleep and obesity in the US adult population: analysis of the national health interview survey (1977-2009). BMC Public Health. 2014 Mar 29;14:290. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-290.
  6. Spiegel K, Leproult R & Van Cauter E. Impact of sleep debt on metabolic and endocrine function. Lancet. 1999 Oct 23; 354(9188):1435-9.
  7. Spiegel K, Tasali E & Penev P et al. Brief communication: sleep curtailment in healthy young men is associated with decreased leptin levels, elevated ghrelin levels, and increased hunger and appetite. Ann Intern Med. 2004 Dec 7; 141(11):846-50.
  8. Miller MA & Cappuccio FP. Inflammation, sleep, obesity and cardiovascular disease. Curr Vasc Pharmacol. 2007 Apr; 5(2):93-102.
*originally posted on IsagenixHealth.com
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Break Up the Monotony!

Cardio … not feeling it? Then it’s time to break up the monotony!

Doing the same old cardio workout can not only leave you bored and unmotivated, but the combo of routine and less enjoyment during aerobic exercise could also lead to a lack of results and fewer calories burned.

Mix things up to avoid the cardio rut. By keeping things fresh, you can improve workout enjoyment while engaging a new set of muscles. You certainly don’t want to avoid cardio altogether.

As a reminder, there’s strong scientific evidence that regular aerobic physical activity comes with some pretty impressive benefits:

  • Supporting healthy weight loss. Combined with a nutritious and calorie controlled diet, aerobic exercise can help you lose weight and keep it off (1).
  • Improving cardiovascular health. About 40 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic exercise three to four times a week can lower the risk for heart disease and stroke (2, 3).
  • Boosting your mood. Whether you’re in the mood for a workout or not, mounting evidence suggests that you will feel better after you’ve finished one (4).
  • Keeping you active as you age. Regular aerobic exercise paired with good nutrition and resistance training can keep your muscles strong and mobile as you age while supporting healthy cognitive function (5).
  • Supporting immune health. Not only does regular aerobic exercise make you feel better physically, but studies have also shown that it can help support healthy immune function for better long-term health (6).
  • Improving quality of sleep. Aerobic exercise has been shown to promote better quality sleep and the speed in which you fall into REM sleep (7).
  • Increasing your overall energy levels. Regular aerobic exercise helps keep your overall energy levels higher. It’s the release of endorphins during your workout that supports lasting energy throughout your day (8).

But despite the many benefits of cardio, it shouldn’t mean you have to suffer for hours doing an activity you don’t like. There are a number of cardio machine alternatives that can add some variety to your routine while still helping you burn about the same amount of calories as 30 minutes of running on the treadmill (around 300 calories for a 150-pound woman). These include…

60 minutes of…

  • Circuit training – a style of weight training that incorporates aerobic activity
  • Taking a dance, Zumba, or jazzercise class
  • Playing in a softball game
  • Boxing

45 minutes of…

  • Rowing
  • Hiking
  • Swimming laps
  • Playing in a soccer game
  • Playing tennis

40 minutes of…

  • High-intensity interval training
  • Ultimate Frisbee
  • Playing flag football

30 minutes of…

  • Jumping rope
  • Taking a kickboxing class
  • Taking a spin class or bicycling outdoors

If you haven’t been regularly exercising, are overweight or have medical conditions, don’t forget to check in with your medical care provider before starting any exercise routine.

These are just a few ideas to help you get off the cardio rut. The key is in finding ways to achieve your goals while making aerobic exercise a lot more fun.

References
  1. Curioni CC, Lourenço PM. Long-term weight loss after diet and exercise: a systematic review. International Journal of Obesity (2005) 29, 1168–1174. doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0803015; published online 31 May 2005
  2. American Heart Association. (2013). American Heart Association recommendations for physical activity in adults. American Heart Association. http://www. heart. org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/PhysicalActivity/Start Walking/American-Heart-Association-Guidelines_UCM_307976_Article. jsp.
  3. Fletcher GF, Balady G, Blair SN, Blumenthal J, Caspersen C, Chaitman B, Epstein S, Sivarajan Froelicher ES, Froelicher VF, Pina IL, Pollock ML. Statement on exercise: benefits and recommendations for physical activity programs for all Americans. A statement for health professionals by the Committee on Exercise and Cardiac Rehabilitation of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, American Heart Association. Circulation. 1996 Aug 15;94(4):857-62. PMID: 8772712
  4. Byrne A, Byrne DG. The effect of exercise on depression, anxiety and other mood states: A review. Journal of Psychosomatic Research , Volume 37 , Issue 6 , 565 – 574
  5. Hyodo K, Dan I, Kyutoku Y, Suwabe K, Byun K, Ochi G, Kato M & Soya H. The association between aerobic fitness and cognitive function in older men mediated by frontal lateralization. Neuroimage. 2016 Jan 15; 125:291-300.
  6. Gleeson M. Immune function in sport and exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology Published 1 August 2007 Vol. 103 no. 2, 693-699 DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00008.2007
  7. Kredlow MA, Capozzoli MC, Hearon BA, Calkins AW, Otto MW. The effects of physical activity on sleep: a meta-analytic review. J Behav Med. 2015 Jun;38(3):427-49. doi: 10.1007/s10865-015-9617-6. Epub 2015 Jan 18.
  8. Puetz TW, Flowers SS, O’Connor PJ. A randomized controlled trial of the effect of aerobic exercise training on feelings of energy and fatigue in sedentary young adults with persistent fatigue. Psychother Psychosom. 2008;77(3):167-74. doi: 10.1159/000116610. Epub 2008 Feb 14.
*originally posted on IsagenixHealth.com
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Exercise for Weight Loss

Changing your dietary habits is the most important action you can take for losing weight and keeping it off. However, exercise shouldn’t be ignored as it can make weight-loss results more pronounced.

Typically, when individuals lose weight, up to a quarter of that lost weight comes from lost lean body mass that includes muscle mass (1). By adding exercise into a weight loss plan, these individuals can minimize the muscle loss and lose higher amounts of fat than those who lose the same amount of weight without exercise.

Exercise also might help with keeping off the weight once it’s lost. As much of an hour of exercise per day is associated with successful weight loss maintenance or avoiding weight regain (2).

Add High-Intensity Interval Training

One type of exercise that may have especially pronounced benefits is high-intensity interval training. Try adding sprint intervals into your next jog by including 60-second bursts at an all-out pace followed by three minutes of recovery at a comfortable pace.

By adding high-intensity intervals to your exercise routine, you can stimulate your metabolism for up to 24-hours, post-exercise. These brief, all-out bursts of activity rev up your calorie burn and keep it elevated long after your workout ends.

Lift Weights or Use Resistance Bands

Resistance training exercises can help build muscle and burn fat. Muscle is more metabolically active than fat, so your overall calorie burn will be higher throughout the day and the drop in metabolism that comes with most weight loss will be prevented. You’ll also look leaner if you have more muscle and less fat.

Start with two or three sets of 10-12 repetitions of bicep curls, overhead presses, squats, and lunges using light weights until your body has adapted and you become comfortable. Then increase the weight and number of repetitions as you get stronger.

Don’t Forget the Cardio

While most cardiovascular exercise (walking, running, cycling, etc.) will not build muscle, it will help you to burn calories and lose fat mass. Cardio itself burns calories and those trying to lose weight and who include cardio into their plan lose more weight compared to those who don’t include exercise (3).

In addition, studies have demonstrated that those who perform cardio are more likely to lose visceral fat (4, 5). Visceral fat is the dangerous kind of “belly fat” that exists internally and can increase risk of chronic disease states (4,5).

Reduce Your Chance of Weight Regain

Most people who lose weight regain it all back and then some within three -to -five years, but regular exercise makes it more likely that you’ll maintain your ideal weight.

According to the American College of Sports Medicine, those with a goal of preventing weight regain should complete 150-250 minutes per week of moderate physical activity – such as brisk walking, mowing the lawn, and swimming (6). The overall calorie burn should be between 1200-2000 calories per week, which is considered enough to prevent weight gain greater than 3 percent.

Incorporating exercise into your lifestyle will not only contribute to benefits in your overall health, but will aid in your weight loss journey as well. However, it’s always suggested that you check with your doctor before starting any type of exercise regimen.

References:
  1. Heymsfield SB, Gonzalez MCC, Shen W, Redman L, and Thomas D. Weight loss composition is one-fourth fat-free mass: a critical review and critique of this widely cited rule. Obes Rev. 2014 Apr; 15(4): 310-21. doi: 1111/obr.12143.
  2. Santos I, Vierira PN, Silva MN, Sardinha LB, and Teixeira PJ. Weight control behaviors of highly successful weight loss maintainers: the Portuguese Weight Control Registry. J Behav Med. 2017 Apr; 40(2): 366-71. doi: 1007/s10865-016-9786-y.
  3. Wu T, Gao X, Chen M, and Van Dam RM. Long-term effectiveness of diet-plus-exercise interventions vs. diet-only interventions for weight loss: a meta-analysis. Obes Rev. 2009 May; 10(3): 313-323. doi: 1111/j.1467-789X.2008.00547.x.
  4. Keating SE, Hackett, DA, Parker HM, O’Connor HT, Gerofi JA, Sainsbury A, Baker MK, Chuter VH, Caterson ID, George J, and Johnson NA. Effect of aerobic exercise training dose on liver fat and visceral adiposity. J Hepatol. 2015 Jul; 63(1): 174-82. doi: 1016/j.jhep.2015.02.022.
  5. Ohkawara K, Tanaka S, Miyachi M, Ishikawa-Takata K, and Tabata I. A dose-response relation between aerobic exercise and visceral fat reduction: systematic review of clinical trials. Int J Obes. 2007 Dec 1: 31(12): 1786.
  6. Donnelly JE, Blair SN, Jakicic JM, Manore MM, Rankin JW, and Smith BK. American College of Sports Medicine Position Stand. Appropriate physical activity intervention strategies for weight loss and prevention of weight regain for adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Feb; 41(2): 459-71. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181949333.
*originally posted on IsagenixHealth.com
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Transformation Tuesday … Work in Progress

Ever had a weight-loss goal? My goal is lofty … I want to lose upwards of 100 pounds.

For YEARS, I’ve had a shake for breakfast … trying different brands and flavors, but never really noticing any health benefits or changes, and feeling hungry by mid-morning, with those never-ending afternoon sugar-cravings!

EVERYTHING changed when I finally had enough! Enough uncomfortably tight clothes, enough self-doubt, and enough struggling! I decided to dive in with this nutritional system to boost my confidence and ignite some weight-loss.

With the full support and encouragement of a long-time high school friend, I embarked on this 30-day journey. And honestly, I didn’t have high hopes given my past “results” with other programs.

I snapped some “before” pictures, wearing a workout outfit that I felt good in, hopped on the scale to find out my starting weight, took my measurements … and in true Shannon form, I created a Fitness Tracking spreadsheet!

Every morning I weighed myself. Some may not agree with that, but it helps keep me accountable. And a surprising revelation was the number on the scale … it was going DOWN!

I hadn’t changed my normal amount of exercise – I still took the bus to and from work every day, and enjoyed being home most evenings and weekends – I simply followed the system, as best I could, which allowed me to still socialize and enjoy life.

After I completed my first month, I weighed and measured. Seven pounds and 6 ½ inches … in 30 DAYS! OMG – this system WORKS! I annihilated over 6% of my weight-loss goal IN THE FIRST MONTH!!! I knew I had to keep going!

The second month was different, however. I had 5 days of vacation right smack-dab in the middle. I knew I wouldn’t be 100% with the program during this time, but did what I could to keep the motivation train on the track. At the end of the month, I checked in and realized I obliterated another 9.2 pounds and 14 more inches!

I’ve incorporated this simple system into my lifestyle, enjoyed my vacation, and I KEEP SEEING RESULTS! I’ve lost a total of 16.2 pounds and a whopping 20 ½ inches … and I’m NOT done yet!

My ultimate goal is to maintain a healthy weight for a minimum of 2 years prior to my 40th birthday … giving me just over 2 ½ years to reach that goal.

If you can relate to any of this, are feeling stuck or just curious to know more I’d love to share. If you can’t already tell I’m pretty thrilled!

Front

Side

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